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car doors feezing shut in ice storm

topic posted Sun, February 25, 2007 - 6:03 PM by  Unsubscribed
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Besides going out every 30 minutes to open and close my car doors during an ice storm, or pouring boiling water over my doors the next morning -- is there any way to prevent my car doors from freezing shut? I'm not just talking the locks, I'm talking the entire door freezing shut.
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  • Unsu...
     
    generously spray the door opening and the door edges with silicone spray. it acts as a release agent. we just had that terrible ice storm last month. but if the ice is so thick it actually covers the entire crack in ice you may have to tap it with something ( i slam it with my hand but my wife prefers to tap it with the handle of a butterknife) to crack the ice before opening. but even so sometimes you have to pound the door crack around the perimeter to break it loose.
    will be glad when spring comes :)
    • Unsu...
       
      Excellent! I actually have some silicone spray handy. You know, if you have to pound the ice off, a rubber mallet works great. Thanks for the silicone spray tip!!!!!! :-) I'll be glad when Spring comes too. I'm not gonna cry about bad weather in Chicago, but worrying if you'll be able to get into your car the next day is a bit much.
  • Unsu...
     
    Silicone is great. Also most any wax will work, car wax is fine, so to Armor All. I think Armor All is silicone too.

    Since you say you have been using hot water - and it may have penetrated the lock - I sugess that you get yourself a cheap bic lighter to keep in your pocket. More than one 20-below night found me huddling next to my car door lock with a bic lighter and my car key in hand warming the key enough to make the lock work.
    • Spraying some WD-40 into the locks should help "dry" them of any water.
      • Unsu...
         
        It's good to know that Armor-All is silicone based and will work. I haven't had any trouble with the locks freezing. Funny, but true.
        • Unsu...
           
          they key is to treat it when it's dry. because one of the way it works is replacing the lost oils from the rubber. silicone is actually a very versatile water repellant sothe the rubber doesn't soak up much. so it may not work as well if the rubber is already soaked before the treatment.
          yes and vice versa... silicone spray is often used in place of armour all .
          silicone spray is also a good fabric water repellent.
          you can NOT use armor all in LOCKS. only 100% silicone or wd-40 or some proper lubricant. the armour alls sheen varnish is unsuitable for locks.
          • Unsu...
             
            ***********they key is to treat it when it's dry. because one of the way it works is replacing the lost oils from the rubber. **********

            I don't think they use rubber for door gaskets. I believe the material is molded elastomeric plastics. Either way replacing any component of the material such as the “oils" you referenced is not possible because the molecular composition of polymers is based on valence shell bonding and you would need to denature the molecule and re-form it to replace anything in it.

            And as to the oils you referenced they are not oil per se but rather plasticizers such as octal-thylates which sublime off into the atmosphere and you simply can't get 'em to go back. Which of course doesn’t say that there is no oil on or in plastic there is, it’s often just the mold release agent. There are oils that will form on the surface of polypropelenofenic polymers they aren’t an integral part of the polymer. Mostly a result of Alkylation, a process that builds big molecules from little molecules. Typically, butenes are mixed with iso-butanes to produce branched chain hydorcarbon polymers called isoparaffins. The oil that can be observed is simply never going to be eliminated from most plastics but it's got nothing to do with flexibility.

            In manufacturing this is a boon as it makes plastics easier to get out of the mold. In labeling it’s a pain cause you gotta flash off the oily patina to get a good paint or glue bond.

            However look at Polycarbonate. No oily patina ever forms on its surface. There are many purer plastics that have no free oil.
            • Cliff, Do you think anyone reeealy understood what you wrote ? ;-)
              Like the over the hill whore said " just grease it up and go ! "
              • Unsu...
                 
                I understood what he wrote.
                • Unsu...
                   
                  did you understand that when i said OILS i was using a generic meaning for someone who had no experience. sort of a LAYMANS term?
                  • This is the maximum depth. Additional responses will not be threaded.
                    Unsu...
                     
                    ***************did you understand that when i said OILS i was using a generic meaning for someone who had no experience. sort of a LAYMANS term************

                    Did I understand?? No.
                    I did not make any assumptions at all about whay you meant or might have meant.

                    I merely addressed the application of the expression as well as the misnomer about re-introducing any element at all to a polymer product at the molecular level which is about what'd need to occur to achieve the result suggested in that post.

                    Look at the label of Armor All. It decieves the user into thinking that it "retores" things. It does nothing of the sort. All that happens is the user applies apply a patina of silicone to what ever surface she is working on. Nothing more happens.
                    Yet the lable clearly says "restore." It's a lie. In legal parlance it's caller puffing and they can get away with it.
              • Unsu...
                 
                **********Cliff, Do you think anyone reeealy understood what you wrote ? ;-)
                Like the over the hill whore said " just grease it up and go ! "***********

                Absolutely Dan. Look: merely because you don't understand something is no reason to assume that others are positioned similarly. I have posted many rather technical posts here on subjects ranging fairly widely and I am frequently amazed at the depth of the knowledge represented in this forum.

                I have encountered engineers, biologists, physics majors - you name it there are a lot of rather well informed and educated people around this tribe.

                It’s not just chicks seeking to know if hot melt glue will stick a papier-mâché carnation to a window sill.
                • Thanks, Cliff, I appreciate the technical explanation.
                  It's always better to understand the causes in depth than to merely be given advice with not enough background info.
                  • This is the maximum depth. Additional responses will not be threaded.
                    re: cliff's explainations... yes... I do understand them... and I appreciate the technical part of things!!!

                    re: the bic... maybe if you are carrying a brief-case, carry an aim-n-flame with you... (like for candles, fireplaces and or barbecues...) easier than the itty bitty lighter...

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